Playwise Wins 2017 Game of the Year Award from Creative Child Magazine

Congratulations to George Ghanotakis and the team at Institute Philos! Playwise, the Game of Wisdom, has won Creative Child Magazine’s Game of the Year Award!

Playwise is so much more than a fun game. It provides the framework for productive conversations that foster critical thinking abilities, moral reasoning, empathy, and dialog skills in children ages 6 and up! It also develops executive function skills such as flexibility in entertaining multiple perspectives, reflection, problem solving, and attentiveness to others. It’s a character building tool that improves student performance in every subject across the curriculum.

Here’s how to play:

Playwise is a game of discussion. Players take turns asking a philosophical question from one of the five categories and reward the best answer with the question card and a laurel card. The winner is the first to collect 10 laurels and a question card from each category.  The more original and creative your answer, the more likely you are to win! You can also win bonus laurels by building on the ideas of your fellow players. Draw comparisons between one idea and another or explore the implications of your opponent’s argument to highlight its strengths and weaknesses. It may lead to a fantastic new insight! It may also lead to bed sheet togas.

George Ghanotakis is working to establish his own Canada-wide tournament of philosophical, democratic discussion inspired by the National High School Ethics Bowl and Philosophy Slam taking place in the United States. He’s calling it the Playwise Olympiads in celebration of the classical tradition of education.  We’re currently looking for schools (elementary, junior high, middle school, and secondary) who are interested in hosting the first event in 2018! For more information, or to volunteer, feel free to contact us any time at info@dc-canada.ca or see the Institute Philos website.

 

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Canada Learning Code Week

From June 1 to 8, more than 10,000 kids across Canada will take part in Canada Learning Code Week, an educational program that combines history and literature with a simple programming tool called Scratch.  These are beginner lessons for kids who want to learn the basics of computer programming. No experience necessary!

We’re very proud to be partnered with Canada Learning Code this year. Students will be using Scratch to create a trivia game based on Bario Leblieux from Dustin Milligan’s story series the Charter for Children.

bariomario

If you’re new to the series, Bario Leblieux aims to help children understand the right to minority language education, which is guaranteed by section 23 of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The purpose of section 23 is to preserve and promote French and English, the two official languages of Canada, in provinces where it is not spoken by the majority of the population.  Kids will learn a little history, test their language skills, and learn some basic programming that they can apply to create… just about anything!

Check out the Canada Learning Code website to find a class near you!

Creating Digital Autonomy

S. Evelyn Cimesa | April 19, 2016 | Learning

 

Gamification experiences are growing in popularity within the educational system: students are more engaged in the learning process, better retain information, and improve their performance on standardized tests. They simultaneously use their critical thinking, social and emotional skills, and personal skills. And, best of all, they actually enjoy themselves.

An environment that encourages autonomy would have minimal outside pressure and offer choices. It would also recognize the goals of others. Learner control is a must as it makes them feel more in control of their actions.

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