New Reviews for Three Little Piggy Banks and Super Hammy – My First Reading Series

It’s been a year since the publication of Three Little Piggy Banks, the financial literacy story book that teaches an easy way to manage money at any age. The author, Pamela George, has become recognized as a local authority on financial wellness! She was featured in a CBC Ottawa special, the Big Owe, putting Canada’s addiction to credit cards in the spotlight. She is also hosting workshops to share the wealth of her experience as a credit counsellor who has seen it all. Here is another great review of Three Little Piggy Banks:

review

Looking for an easy way to teach kids about money? 

Our most recent publication is Super Hammy – My First Reading Series, by Oksanna Crawley, a former Kindergarten and Reading Recovery teacher. This collection of levelled readers has now been approved by Fountas & Pinnell! Fifteen books in three levels of difficulty will help struggling or first time readers grow accustomed to sentence structure and common words. The set comes with an audiobook CD voiced by the author/illustrator’s daughter, a professional voice actor. See what teachers are saying about Super Hammy:

review

 

2 - posterLooking for more resources to help young readers? The Super Hammy alphabet poster is a great tool for kids who are learning to recognize and write the letters of the alphabet. The new poster features more funny and original artwork by Oksanna Crawley to give kids a visual memory anchor for the sound of each letter.

 

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The entire series has recently been translated into French ! Super Hami is available for pre-order today and will begin shipping in December.

 

Do you have feedback about any of DC Canada’s books? We would love to hear from you! Write to us at info@dc-canada.ca, follow us on Facebook, or tweet to us on Twitter!

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Praise for Three Little Piggy Banks, a Financial Literacy Story Book

Below is a rave review of Three Little Piggy Banks by Pamela George. The review comes from a librarian, Catherine Bellamy, and is published in the Resource Link newsletter:

As a librarian, I haven’t often come across books that teach financial literacy to kids, so when I read Three Little Piggy Banks, I wasn’t sure what to expect. Financial literacy can seem intimidating, even for adults who have been paying bills and other expenses for years and years. It seems almost impossible to unpack such a mature subject for the youngest of children, but author Pamela George deftly simplifies the subject for young children. The book provides a very basic understanding of money: saving it, sharing it, and spending it. In the book, five-year old twins, Ella and Andy, are taught about saving money by their parents, who buy them each three piggy banks for their birthday. One piggy bank is for saving, one piggy bank is for sharing, and one is for spending.

In this book, children are shown how to be fiscally responsible in the simplest way. Each week, the children receive an allowance and they must decide how much to put in each bank. The kids each want to buy something big: Ella wants a camera and Andy wants a bicycle. Their parents guide them to getting what they want by setting goals, setting aside money every week, calculating how long it will take to save up enough money, all the while setting aside some of their allowance for sharing with others and for savings. Even though the book is about financial literacy, it also teaches about having compassion for others less fortunate, which is why one of the piggy banks the children receive is for sharing.

The note to parents and teachers by the author at the beginning of the book outlines some of the goals the author hopes the book will accomplish. Among these goals are to teach delayed gratification, keeping track of expenses, living within out means, and separating spending and saving. There is even an exercise that parents can do with kids, such as buying or making piggy banks and decorating them with children (modeled after the story). There is even a worksheet at the end of the book to help kids create financial goals and keep track of how much they are saving, spending, and sharing. This is an excellent book to help parents and educators teach children about financial literacy and why it is so important.

Thematic Links: Financial Literacy; Being Responsible with Money; Spending; Sharing; Saving; Delayed Gratification; Setting Goals; Allowance; Learning Skills

By Catherine Bellamy

Pamela George is giving a free workshop in Ottawa on Nov. 21st where she will be happy to answer questions about personal finance. Sign up today!  https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/event/three-little-piggy-banks-teaching-financial-literacy-children

finlit workshop info

Three Little Piggy Banks

November was a special month for DC Canada and a passionate local financial planner, and author, Pamela George. The 5th was the official release of Three Little Piggy Banks, a personal finance storybook for ages 4 to 8. Both the author and illustrator Meredith Luce received congratulatory plaques from Mayor Jim Watson whom called the book a “must read” and “fun teaching tool for young readers.”

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Twins, Ella and Andy each receive three piggy banks for their birthday when they already have their hearts set on a camera and a bike. Why three piggy banks? Their clever parents have a much bigger gift in mind: a lesson in financial wisdom and a plan to set the twins up for a life of financial security.

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It’s really that easy. Three dollars a week and a handy pull-out tracking sheet that comes with the book will give young readers a solid foundation of financial literacy that can improve their lives immeasurably.

We had the chance to talk to kids about piggy banks at Chapters-Rideau on November 12th.  It was no surprise that when we brought up the subject of saving, many kids told us about their dreams for the future and their heart’s desires. They know the exact amount they have saved in a piggy bank or their bank account, and often they know exactly how they plan to spend it. One boy claimed his $350 of savings would be spent on exactly 350 ice cream cones. Others had more practical goals in mind.

With a bit of guidance, youngsters will take on the responsibility of managing an allowance of any size with a lot of enthusiasm. Three Little Piggy Banks is a great tool for starting this conversation and illustrating the necessity of living within one’s means. Pamela George believes it is never too soon to start learning about money and how to manage it, so pick up a piggy bank, or two, or three! Start a conversation about personal finance with your kids today.

Les trois tirelires

Novembre était un mois spécial pour DC Canada et pour une planificatrice financière locale, et auteure, Pamela George. Le cinq novembre marquait le lancement de « Three Little Piggy Banks », un livre d’histoire sur les finances personnelles pour les enfants entre quatre et huit ans. L’auteure et l’illustratrice Meredith Luce ont reçu des plaques de félicitations du Maire Jim Watson qui a déclaré le livre « à lire absolument » et qui l’a qualifié « d’outil d’apprentissage amusant pour jeunes lecteurs ».

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Les jumeaux Ella et Andy ont reçu trois tirelires pour leur anniversaire alors qu’ils désiraient à ce point faire l’acquisition d’une caméra et d’un vélo. Pourquoi trois tirelires? Leurs parents, futés, avaient un cadeau beaucoup plus important en tête : une leçon de sagesse et de sécurité financière à vie pour leurs jumeaux.

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C’est réellement aussi facile. Trois dollars par semaine et une feuille de suivi détachable accompagnant le livre offriront aux jeunes lecteurs des bases solides d’alphabétisation financière qui pourront améliorer leurs vies de façon incommensurable.

Nous avons eu la chance de discuter avec des enfants au sujet des tirelires à la boutique Chapters Rideau le 12 Novembre. Ce ne fût pas une surprise, une fois le sujet des économies soulevé, de constater que plusieurs enfants aient naturellement des profonds désirs et rêves à partager quant à leur futur. Ils savaient exactement quelle somme ils avaient économisé dans leur tirelire ou dans leur compte, et ils savaient souvent exactement sur quoi allaient le dépenser. Un garçon a prétendu avoir 350$ d’économisé et qu’il allait le dépenser sur exactement 350 cornets de crème glacée. D’autres avaient des buts plus pratiques en tête.

Avec un peu d’orientation, les jeunes prendront la responsabilité de gérer leur allocation quelle que soit sa taille avec grand enthousiasme. « Three Little Piggy Banks » est un excellent outil qui permet d’amorcer ce sujet de discussion et d’illustrer la nécessité de vivre selon ses moyens. Pamela George croit qu’il n’est jamais trop tôt pour commencer à apprivoiser l’argent et la gérer, alors équipez-vous d’une, de deux ou de trois tirelires! Entamez une conversation au sujet des finances personnelles de vos enfants dès aujourd’hui.