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Praise for Three Little Piggy Banks, a Financial Literacy Story Book

Below is a rave review of Three Little Piggy Banks by Pamela George. The review comes from a librarian, Catherine Bellamy, and is published in the Resource Link newsletter:

As a librarian, I haven’t often come across books that teach financial literacy to kids, so when I read Three Little Piggy Banks, I wasn’t sure what to expect. Financial literacy can seem intimidating, even for adults who have been paying bills and other expenses for years and years. It seems almost impossible to unpack such a mature subject for the youngest of children, but author Pamela George deftly simplifies the subject for young children. The book provides a very basic understanding of money: saving it, sharing it, and spending it. In the book, five-year old twins, Ella and Andy, are taught about saving money by their parents, who buy them each three piggy banks for their birthday. One piggy bank is for saving, one piggy bank is for sharing, and one is for spending.

In this book, children are shown how to be fiscally responsible in the simplest way. Each week, the children receive an allowance and they must decide how much to put in each bank. The kids each want to buy something big: Ella wants a camera and Andy wants a bicycle. Their parents guide them to getting what they want by setting goals, setting aside money every week, calculating how long it will take to save up enough money, all the while setting aside some of their allowance for sharing with others and for savings. Even though the book is about financial literacy, it also teaches about having compassion for others less fortunate, which is why one of the piggy banks the children receive is for sharing.

The note to parents and teachers by the author at the beginning of the book outlines some of the goals the author hopes the book will accomplish. Among these goals are to teach delayed gratification, keeping track of expenses, living within out means, and separating spending and saving. There is even an exercise that parents can do with kids, such as buying or making piggy banks and decorating them with children (modeled after the story). There is even a worksheet at the end of the book to help kids create financial goals and keep track of how much they are saving, spending, and sharing. This is an excellent book to help parents and educators teach children about financial literacy and why it is so important.

Thematic Links: Financial Literacy; Being Responsible with Money; Spending; Sharing; Saving; Delayed Gratification; Setting Goals; Allowance; Learning Skills

By Catherine Bellamy

Pamela George is giving a free workshop in Ottawa on Nov. 21st where she will be happy to answer questions about personal finance. Sign up today!  https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/event/three-little-piggy-banks-teaching-financial-literacy-children

finlit workshop info